Milk Does The Body GOOD

before i continue with my journey breastfeeding, i have to reflect on how i got here.

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i don’t believe my mom nursed me very long after i was born. as we all know, nursing is full of different sacrifices and it just doesn’t work out for some mamas. so my knowledge of breastfeeding was very, very limited. i was never opposed to it – when i saw women feeding their children, i didn’t have an opinion one way or the other.

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when i was 23, i traveled to honduras for a short-term missions trip. as we drove to camp in our big white tourist-looking bus, i met eyes with all walks of life. the hondurans never shied away from looking at the people passing by – and i was almost always met with a welcoming smile. they continued living their lives, unfazed by the bus filled with eager american teenagers. truth be told, they probably see hundreds of these buses a week.

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what i’ll never forget is the beautiful mother nursing her baby as she walked down the street. no cover up, no fancy nursing bra, no special comfy chair, no perfect firm pillow, no anxiety, no impatience toward her baby. her child had a need, and rather than think of 17 different issues or scenarios, she fed. she fed.

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i’ll always remember that beautiful woman taking care of her baby – it gives me courage and perspective when Stone cries in Red Robin and i debate running to the bathroom stall, or the car, or if i choose to take care of my baby right in the booth.

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#worldbreastfeedingweek is an opportunity to bring a lot of awareness to this miracle of the human body. but one major goal is to bring to light the malnutrition children suffer in countries like honduras and how breastfeeding prevents hunger and malnutrition in all its forms and ensures food security for babies, even in times of crisis. i think back to my experience in honduras specifically, and i see women doing exactly what’s best for their babies. that deep desire doesn’t know geographical boundaries. it’s ingrained in every mother. that humbles me.